When I first entered public service at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), I wanted to improve how it served veterans— veterans like my mother and father, who each served in the U.S. Air Force, where they first met and had me. How the VA provided home mortgages to veterans, one of which bought the… Read More

What they said: Right to Work is Wrong for Missouri  In Missouri, union-backed opponents of the state’s new Right to Work law argue it’s an “unfair government overreach” and “politicians interfering in the workplace.” Voters will have a choice in November’s election to uphold or reject the law, but union leaders and their allies are twisting… Read More

This article was first published in The Hill on September 12, 2017. This year, the U.S. will usher in Hispanic Heritage Month with renewed assurances that a wall costing a mind-boggling $10 billion to $21.6 billion will be erected along our southern border — a physical structure further dividing two neighbors and vital trade partners. This… Read More

The escalating racial tensions and hate-filled rhetoric that have tragically led to the death of innocent citizens in our own country these past weeks, and over the course of this past year, should give all Americans pause. For those who truly aspire to become agents of positive change and help heal our nation, these tragic… Read More

ICYMI: A former bus driver and trade union leader who rose through the ranks of Venezuelan government under former and deceased president Hugo Chavez has finally driven the country off the proverbial cliff. Under Nicolás Maduro, Venezuela is officially a full-fledged dictatorship. And the country’s economic and humanitarian crisis has now reached critical mass following… Read More

My father recently retired after working nearly thirty years in the restaurant service industry. It’s hard work. I tried it for a summer and knew that I was not cut out for it. The hours are long. You are on your feet most of the time. Breaks are rare and the environment can be incredibly… Read More

The bigger Medicaid becomes, the less care the neediest people actually receive. What is Medicaid? An easy explanation for the average voter: Founded in 1965, Medicaid is a jointly funded, federal-state insurance project for low-income and needy Americans. Initially, the program covered impoverished children, the blind, the disabled and others who are eligible to receive… Read More

On June 11, the voters of Puerto Rico took to the polls to determine our future path. The nonbinding decision before us: seal Puerto Rico’s relationship with the United States through statehood; maintain the commonwealth status quo; or become an independent nation. Voters overwhelmingly chose statehood, to the tune of 97 percent. But the results… Read More

From the notebook of our own Think Freely Media advisory board member, Israel Ortega: There are those who insist on telling us that the economy is rigged, and that it is impossible to rise through the ranks and achieve the American Dream. Fortunately, many of us know that is not the case. Check out these… Read More

Recently, many in our country celebrated National Charter School Week. Numerous events marked the occasion and the White House even issued a proclamation to help raise awareness. But what exactly is a charter school? For starters, charter schools are public schools. This is worth noting because many confuse charter schools with private schools. They are… Read More